Toronto confirmed cases of rare infectious disease

April 25, 2020 — Toronto Public Health officials say they have confirmed three cases of Omicron variant fever in Toronto. The first case of Omicron variant fever, according to Toronto Public Health, was confirmed…

Toronto confirmed cases of rare infectious disease

April 25, 2020 — Toronto Public Health officials say they have confirmed three cases of Omicron variant fever in Toronto.

The first case of Omicron variant fever, according to Toronto Public Health, was confirmed on November 25, 2017. Omicron variant fever is an often fatal infectious disease caused by viruses spread through contaminated fluid or saliva.

The conditions that cause Omicron variant fever include travel abroad, sexual activity or exposure to semen. It is not an acquired disease, meaning people may be affected by a previous exposure to the infection and have passed it along.

The latest two patients were both exposed to each other and in separate groups at a group camp, according to Toronto Public Health. While the first case had an exposure outside Canada, the other two had no such exposure.

The three cases all remained in Toronto and recovered from their illness. The patients’ ages range from 19 to 34 years old, according to Toronto Public Health.

Out of 438 cases of the infection reported by Canadian provinces and territories since 2009, only 17 were from Canada’s largest metropolitan area. Toronto Public Health has notified the Ontario Ministry of Health, and other provinces are also involved in investigating the outbreak.

A Public Health Alert was issued on April 16 and public information about symptoms and symptoms of Omicron variant fever is being distributed in local media and online to raise awareness of this disease.

Omicron variant fever is rare, according to Toronto Public Health, and symptoms of the infection may not appear for several weeks. Some people will experience severe illness that includes fever, chills, increased respiratory rate, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, abdominal pain, cold hands and feet, or soft, grayish, clear liquid that may enter the urine, or enter the eyes.

People with Omicron variant fever can also experience a headache, aches, fatigue, chest pain and/or shortness of breath, nausea and vomiting, or diabetes and/or atherosclerosis.

Leave a Comment