Steve Jobs death: how the tech billionaire lived to be 69

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Steve Jobs was born on 30 April 1955 in San Francisco Steve Jobs was one of the world’s most influential figures after he died in 2011, and in…

Steve Jobs death: how the tech billionaire lived to be 69

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Steve Jobs was born on 30 April 1955 in San Francisco

Steve Jobs was one of the world’s most influential figures after he died in 2011, and in his 60s he became one of the world’s richest individuals.

So how did the Apple co-founder live such a long life?

Beaming and gambling

There were reports he gambled away his millions, but he has always denied the stories.

In a 2005 interview, he said: “When I started gambling in my 20s, I won $400,000; I went bankrupt after a couple of years.

“My life was miserable.”

He did, however, look after his career, moving to the University of California’s business school at 21 before going into tech, although he gave up management duties at Apple to go travelling.

What can I say? Maybe he was just a bit buffoonish, but I’m convinced he went on to achieve all he did.

Instagram

Technology was his only true love, and he grew up using a black Sharp Casio calculator that he took everywhere he went.

He told an interviewer in 2006 that he was “playing Jenga until the phone died” before he hit puberty, and had to get by with just his parents, his brother, a sibling, and some parents taking turns driving to school.

In 2010, he joined Instagram and liked it almost immediately. His approval was good news for the app, which was already huge. By the end of the year, he had 100,000 followers, before hitting 2 million four years later.

By 2012, he was following more than a million people, and advertising was extended to the service.

He also had a search engine of his own, with something called intromonium.

“A search from it is like looking in a crystal ball, like God looking at his reflection,” he said in 2011.

Gulfstream

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Apple launched its personalised logo of the Apple logo on the plane in 2008

Shortly after his 30th birthday, Apple launched its personalised logo on the plane, which travelled to corporate events around the world.

He told Wired magazine: “We fly around the world a lot and I like to see what we’re doing.”

He also described a G7 summit he had attended in Montreal in 2010.

“You spend two days talking about such-and-such, and when it was done, it seemed like we’d been there for a month,” he said.

He also said he made “roughly $400,000” a year from the flight, and that it was as luxurious as it could be because he had an agent, pay check, and hotels for the weekend.

Friendly, but not crazy

Jobs may have been the world’s first hypochondriac, but that never got in the way of his life and was not something he was concerned about.

“I still want to retire. I’d like to be at home most of the time. I was pretty happy when I worked 12 hours a day, six days a week,” he said in 1996.

“But if I get bored, I think that’s healthy. I’m not one of those nuts that say, ‘It’s impossible to have too much.’ I just don’t think it is.”

But he was a liberal when it came to divorce and women, and admitted he saw women as “a bit of a problem” with his wealth.

He divorced his first wife, Chrisann Brennan, in 1978 with whom he had a daughter, Lisa Brennan-Jobs, but left her with two daughters.

“I’m sure it makes her crazy and sometimes I wish it didn’t,” he said.

Image copyright AP Image caption Sarah Houston, from Chicago, centre, was one of hundreds of people lined up to pay tribute to Jobs

Mr Jobs married Laurene Powell, with whom he had two sons, in 2012.

And even at the age of 65, he was at work in March 2015, trying to tackle his health problems.

Dr Farea Al-Muslimi, a Syrian doctor and a visiting lecturer at Arizona State University, was organising a tech summit in the US city of San Francisco in 2014 when he met Mr Jobs.

They later spoke by phone and the doctors never forgot that it was Mr Jobs who asked them to organise the event.

Dr Al-Muslimi said Mr Jobs was a great example of a leader who cared deeply about people.

“Steve brought people together and worked so hard for the people around him, and that’s what I admired most about him,” he said.

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