Antibiotic resistance: How bugs are spread by culture

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption According to these maps, in Zulu, the inverted Z is the erythritol or erythritol, the rounded X is the erythritol phosphate Many people in the world are exposed…

Antibiotic resistance: How bugs are spread by culture

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption According to these maps, in Zulu, the inverted Z is the erythritol or erythritol, the rounded X is the erythritol phosphate

Many people in the world are exposed to so-called antibiotic resistant organisms – superbugs that are more difficult to treat.

The European Group for Testing Medicines and Medicines (EGM) tested Ebola and other Ebola-like diseases in humans in 2013 to assess whether these infections could be treated with such drugs.

They have used similar molecular structures to understand how bugs spread to new environments.

Team leader Guneet Singh, a researcher from the Viral Haematology Group at Queen Mary University of London, explains how they do this.

Scientists have found that bacteria spread easily between communities

Tell us your experiences

Your stories are featured on BBC World Service.

AQ from South Africa is a common SADC animal disease reservoir and causes abrupt death – it affects early pregnancy, bone marrow development and most importantly, ultimately, the ability of the embryo to grow.

Blood samples from a number of patients were collected, and two different vaccines were made.

Read more on avian flu

They were subjected to this in-vitro strain isolation methodology: where cells exposed to antibiotic germs were placed in a laboratory test tube and placed in a solution.

The results were interesting: if that germy microbe was pushed by as little as two copies of two complementary pieces of DNA, the cells did not proliferate and died.

Most sophisticated sets of genetic information have double copies – something that is much more difficult to detect in-vitro.

The researchers say the results are very interesting – not just to drug companies, but also to public health officials, medical workers and even researchers.

“It is very probable,” says Guneet Singh, “that when you have these resistant organisms in circulation, those organisms are infectious – which poses a big risk for health workers and the general public.”

So, the challenge is now to make it simpler, cheaper and faster to develop vaccines and treatments – in the next year and a half, most of the ingredients to make the clinical vaccine are already available.

The next challenge is developing ways to treat infections where this antibiotics resistance is most problematic.

Leave a Comment